Tag Archives: Scania

Hörja church

Hörja parish church in northern Scania, built in the thirteenth century. The tower is added 1924. My grandparents and my aunt and uncles are buried here.
Hörja parish church in northern Scania, built in the thirteenth century. The tower is added 1924. My grandparents and my aunt and uncles are buried here.
We are in the northern parts of Scania famous for it guerilla fighters during the Scanian war between Denmark and Sweden. The war ended with Scania and the neighbouring provinces of Blekinge and Halland belonging to Sweden. Scania was danish until 1658.

This is Hörja church, one of the parishes my father´s ancestors came from. Most of his ancestors moved between Hörja, neighbouring parishes Finja and Västra Torup as far as I have been able to trace them which probably means they were here long before the 17th century. The oldest I have been able to trace are born in the 1400s.

In the autumn after my aunt died my son and I went for mass at All Saint´s Day to this church. All Saint´s Day is a day when you bring flowers and candles to the graves of those you want to remember, though I live too far away from the graves of my relatives so I don´t do it. All Saint´s Day is celebrated at the same time as Halloween in the United States.

But at the end of the mass the vicar brought us out to the entrance of the church to sing a hymn with a stanza about the ancestors lying to rest in the churchyard, Knowing that my ancestors had lived here for generations that was a very special feeling.


Måkläppen in Falsterbo

A freezing november day we went to have a look at Måklåppen that is a seal reservation during the summer and only allowed to go onto in the winter.
A freezing november day we went to have a look at Måkläppen that is a seal reservation during the summer and only allowed to go onto in the winter.
In the southeastern corner of Sweden there is a reservation for seals. You are only allowed on the premises during the winter so we went there in december 2014. It is called Måkläppen and lies in Falsterbo in Sweden.

To show kindness to outcasts

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The postcard this week is from Kirseberg in the east of Malmö, on the hill where the witches were burnt. I always sort of thought this was were there were gallows but during my research for a post on Weekly Weather last year I came to realize that the gallows were either close to the beach in medieval times and later closer to the city. Not much on Wikipedia or internet on the witch burnings in Malmö, though there is quite a lot about the other witch burnings in Denmark and the witch hunts in Sweden. Malmö belonged to Denmark until 1658 so it may be that those that write on Wikipedia aren´t interested in something they don´t feel is proper Danish history or proper Swedish history. Anyhow I got a book from the library by a local historian written in 1915 and had a peek in it. The witches in Denmark were not executed like in Sweden but burnt. There was a big fire lit on Kirseberg and the witch was tied to a ladder and thrown into the fire.

The Danish king Christian IV of Denmark encouraged witch hunts and the burning of witches. Witch hunts were earlier in Denmark than in the other Scandinavian countries beginning in the sixteenth century and ending in the late seventeenth century with a total of 1000 witches killed. In Norway the witch hunts take place between 1610 and 1690 and in Sweden between 1668 – 1676. Sweden had 300 killed witches and Finland 115. As Finland then was a part of Sweden this means that was 415 people killed in these countries. Norway has 300 killed witches.

The memorial stone was raised in 1997 to the memory of the witches that died on this place during the years 1543 – 1663, to the memory of the poor soldiers that was buried here 1809 – 1870 and to the memory of the prisoners that died in the prison on Malmöhus castle 1827 – 1891.

The memorial stone ends with a sentence that wants us to think about the outcasts of our own times. And I think it is quite important today with all that happens around us. I have translated the ending sentence on the memorial stone as: “This stone honors all the people that was excluded from the community of their time and encourages the future to reflect on their fate”.

The tower in the background is an old water tower converted to an apartment building. It was built in 1879 but it was soon discovered that it was inadequate for the needs of Malmö and converted to apartments.

The name Kirseberg means Cherry Hill.

This picture was originally published on my other blog Weekly Weather. I am also sharing this post with The Daily Post’s discover challenge: Mixing Media.


Old telephone booth in Simrishamn

Old telephone booth by the railway station in Simrishamn.
Old telephone booth by the railway station in Simrishamn.

We are in Simrishamn and looking at a telephone booth no longer in use. It stands by the railway station as a memorial of times gone by. The picture is taken in the autumn of 2013 and published before on From My Horizon.